CraftyPod #90: Designers in a Changing World, with Sarah Hodsdon

27 Apr 2009

The fantastic cardboard dress Sarah brought to CHA.

 
Sorry, this podcast is no longer available. You can still listen to some other free shows, or browse additional shows for sale.

In this show:

- An interview with Sarah Hodsdon, a successful designer who has a lot to say about how that profession is changing.

- What's the difference between a business and a glorified hobby?

- How does the influence of the web (and how easy copying and stealing ideas becomes there) affect a designer's livelihood?

- What is the role of a designer in a global, digital economy?

 
Two designs from Sarah's work for Mrs. Butterworth's. Link below!

Links:

- Lots of inspiration to be had on Sarah's blog.

- I highly recommend following Sarah on Twitter. She gives great tweet.

- Here's Sarah's store on Cafe Press.

Speaking of crafty McGyvering, check out what Sarah did with Mrs. Butterworth's bottles.

Categories: 

Comments

I find the comments about crafter vs. artist vs. designer interesting. I remember at some point in my career having difficulty giving myself a title that made sense. I was afraid to call myself an artist because that is usually reserved for those in the fine arts. Crafter made many people think of dried flowers and a glue gun. Finally, I received an email from a magazine I wrote for with that started "Dear Designers." Ah, so! I "design" projects for other people to do. While my focus is often jewelry, I use all kinds of media to make jewelry and other types of hand-created work from crochet to sewing to paper-arts. I also embrace the idea of the term "crafts." Crafting has a long and rich history (as was discussed in this podcast), and I'm proud to say that I'm a designer and crafter.


I found this very relevant, I've been thinking a lot about the money and business side of art lately, especially in relation to my own practice - and not reaching any happy conclusions unfortunately! So it was good to hear from someone who seems to be better able to manage these things than I am.


I just listened to this podcast and must admit- I found it very disturbing. I wish there had been a glossary of terms- what is a designer vs an artist vs a crafter. Actually, I don't think the word artist was used- and what is a designer if not an artist? What is an artist if they don't have an identifiable style? I'm confused!


Very inspirational podcast, Sister Diane!

Thanks so much for your work... much much appreciated.


Just to respond to both Francesca and Mimi here - I think we're in a moment when words like "artist," "crafter," and "designer" are growing into very similar meanings. In my book, they're pretty interchangeable, and in fact I like a world where they can blend rather than divide us.

I'm sorry you both found this show disturbing. I think everything Sarah has to say is highly relevant to creative professionals of all stripes, and that in her answers to my questions, she isn't making distinctions between artists, crafters, and designers. She's actually making distinctions between hobbyists and professionals.


Hodsdon seems to be successful at what she does and is articulate, intelligent, and creative. But I agree with Mimi--the interview was a bit disturbing. As a corporate graphic designer myself, I felt that Hodsdon was using the term "design" when she should have used "craft" or "art." It may be misleading and confusing for some.


I really enjoyed this podcast, thank you for creating it and sharing great tips for us "designers" and "crafters" alike. :P


I really enjoyed this podcast, thank you for creating it and sharing great tips for us "designers" and "crafters" alike. :P


I just listened to this podcast and must admit- I found it very disturbing. I wish there had been a glossary of terms- what is a designer vs an artist vs a crafter. Actually, I don't think the word artist was used- and what is a designer if not an artist? What is an artist if they don't have an identifiable style? I'm confused!


Very inspirational podcast, Sister Diane!

Thanks so much for your work... much much appreciated.


Hodsdon seems to be successful at what she does and is articulate, intelligent, and creative. But I agree with Mimi--the interview was a bit disturbing. As a corporate graphic designer myself, I felt that Hodsdon was using the term "design" when she should have used "craft" or "art." It may be misleading and confusing for some.


Just to respond to both Francesca and Mimi here - I think we're in a moment when words like "artist," "crafter," and "designer" are growing into very similar meanings. In my book, they're pretty interchangeable, and in fact I like a world where they can blend rather than divide us.

I'm sorry you both found this show disturbing. I think everything Sarah has to say is highly relevant to creative professionals of all stripes, and that in her answers to my questions, she isn't making distinctions between artists, crafters, and designers. She's actually making distinctions between hobbyists and professionals.


I found this very relevant, I've been thinking a lot about the money and business side of art lately, especially in relation to my own practice - and not reaching any happy conclusions unfortunately! So it was good to hear from someone who seems to be better able to manage these things than I am.


I find the comments about crafter vs. artist vs. designer interesting. I remember at some point in my career having difficulty giving myself a title that made sense. I was afraid to call myself an artist because that is usually reserved for those in the fine arts. Crafter made many people think of dried flowers and a glue gun. Finally, I received an email from a magazine I wrote for with that started "Dear Designers." Ah, so! I "design" projects for other people to do. While my focus is often jewelry, I use all kinds of media to make jewelry and other types of hand-created work from crochet to sewing to paper-arts. I also embrace the idea of the term "crafts." Crafting has a long and rich history (as was discussed in this podcast), and I'm proud to say that I'm a designer and crafter.